image

Barney McKenna: Discography
Anthologies


The Hoot'nanny Show – Volume 2
image 
  • The Hoot'nanny Show – Volume 2
    • 1964 - Waverley ZLP 2032 LP

image  Show Details

image  Hide Details

  • Side One
    1. Kellyburn Braes — Roy Guest
    2. Johnny I Hardly Knew You — Ray and Archie Fisher
    3. John Riley — Eleanor Leith
    4. Mason's Apron Barney McKenna
  • Side Two
    1. Strangest Dream — Roy Guest
    2. Blackleg Miner — Ray and Archie Fisher
    3. Water Is Wide — Eleanor Leith
    4. The Roving Ploughboy Corrie Folk Trio & Paddie Bell
    5. Johnny McEldoo — Ray and Archie Fisher
    6. Everybody Loves Saturday Night — Roy Guest

  • Credits
    • Recording first published 1964. All recordings made at folk concerts with Edinburgh audiences.
    • Recorded in Edinburgh and introduced and produced by W. Gordon Smith

Sleeve Notes

KELLYBURN BRAES (Roy Guest)
There are few jollier jumpy Irish songs than tins. Even if its rhythms, bounce, and chirpy tune failed to catch the attention and set the feet tapping, its message — if such yon can, call it — could attract its own audience … "surely the women are worse than the men, when you send them to hell they get sent hack again."

JOHNNY I HARDLY KNEW YOU (Ray and Archie Fisher)
Another Irish song, but there is nothing very pleasant about it. A song of protest, an anguished cry against war, the determined — if historically fruitless — resolution by a woman that men will never fight again. "Theyre rolling out the guns again, but they never will take our sons again" means what it says on this occasion because Johnny has come back from the war … "you hadn't an arm, you hadn't a leg, you're an eyeless, boneless, chicken-less egg, you'll have to be put with a bowl to beg."

JOHN RILEY (Eleanor Leith)
Scholars squabble over the origins of this beautiful ballad, manv of them claiming it as a seventeenth century British "broadside ballad." Today it is usually thought of as an American song, largely because of the beautiful interpretations of it by Joan Baez and others. Eleanor thinks of it simply as a ballad about a young girl, the young girl of every boy's imaginings.

MASON'S APRON (Barney McKenna)
For one brief second, the flashing moment between a string being plucked and unplucked (or "picked" in the contemporary folk idiom), this recording is imperfect. But in its space and time and virtuosity and subtlety and sheer driving energy it is an excellent illustration of the tenor banjo playing of one of the great folk artists of the world.

STRANGEST DREAM (Roy Guest)
A very different sort of protest against war, gentler, ironic, using fantasy to ridicule the basic insanity of any situation that could provoke a war.

BLACKLEG MINER (Ray and Archie Fisher)
Industrial strife in the bitter bad old days of the mines provoked this Northumbrian ballad. Few songs are so completely unyielding in their attitude. The blackleg or the scab — the worker who defies the strike call of his mates — is still regarded as something that belongs under a stone. It is not a pretty song. Indeed, in these more tolerant times, it is a provocative, ugly song. But it expresses in most eloquent terms the genuine emotions of people at bay.

WATER IS WIDE (Eleanor Leith)
Probably the most international of all folk songs, different versions of it being shared by many countries, "I leaned my back against an oak, thinking it was a trusty tree, but first it bended then it broke, and so did my false love to me" is probably the verse that exists in all of the versions. There is even a version, on "O Waly, Waly" lines, which is unmistakably an Edinburgh variation of the old song. Eleanor's lyric, however, comes from across the Atlantic.

THE ROVING PLOUGHBOY (Corrie Folk Trio and Paddie Bell)
An uncomplicated but lovely romantic ballad from the north-cost of Scotland — that great storehouse of much that is best in Scottish folk music.

JOHNNY McELDOO (Ray and Archie Fisher)
Rav and Archie have turned this whimsical Irish song about gluttony into a whimsical Scottish song about the same thing. The melody swings along with an insistent wallop; the lyric, a tongue-twister if ever there was one, is a singer's nightmare.

EVERYBODY LOVES SATURDAY NIGHT (Roy Guest)
A song that is thought of today as nothing, much more than good fun. But in its origins in Africa it was, in its- way, a protest against the restriction of the freedom of the individual. Roy Guest has since made it a personal tour-de-force.

Top Index

Fleá Ceoil
image 
  • Fleá Ceoil
    • 1965 (circa) - Gael-Linn CEF 013 LP

image  Show Details

image  Hide Details

  • Side One
    1. Erin Go Bragh — Dawn Quartet
    2. Banish Misfortune — Padraig Nugent agus Cathal McConnell
    3. An Droignean Donn — Sile Ni Fhlatharta
    4. Bosca Ceoil Agus Fidil — Micheal O hEidhin agus Seamus O Maolain
    5. The Nightingale — Na deirfiuracha Grehan (the Grehan Sisters) agus Fergus Cahill
    6. The High Reel — Na deirfiuracha Grehan (the Grehan Sisters) agus Fergus Cahill
    7. Patrun Cillshleibhe — Diarmaid O hIceadha
    8. Crowley's — Brendan McGlinchey
  • Side Two
    1. Sailor On The Rock Barney McKenna
    2. Tomas Ban MacAodhagain — Maire Ni Dhonncha
    3. Spailpin A Run — Sean Seery
    4. Enniskillen Dragoons — Fergus Cahill
    5. Sliabh Na MBan — Cathal McConnell
    6. Cuaichin Ghleann Neifin — Padraig O Cathain
    7. Cregg's Pipes — Felix Doran
    8. The Lowlands Of Holland David Hammond
    9. The Dawn — Banna Ceili

Notes

This album is not in my collection, therefore this information comes from other sources. According to a post on The Session, "There is no date on either the cover or the Album, although the sleeve notes mention that the recording was actually carried out at a 'gathering' in Clones, Co Monaghan, in 1964."

Additionally, Douglas Clark states on his Dubliners discography that Ronnie Drew also plays on the track, "The Sailor on the Rock" with Barney McKenna.

Top Index

Ulster's Flowery Vale
image 
  • Ulster's Flowery Vale
    • 1968 - BBC REC 28M LP

image  Show Details

image  Hide Details

  • Side One
    1. Mrs. McLeod's Reel — Sean McAloon (Uileann Pipes), Tommy Gunn (Fiddle) & Cathal McConnell (Flute)
    2. The Lowlands of Holland — Sung by David Hammond
    3. Jig: Drops of Brandy Barney McKenna (Banjo)
    4. Red Red Rose — Sung by Sarah Makem
    5. Pair of Jigs: The Maid in the Meadow/The Battering Ram — Sean McAloon (Uileann Pipes), Tommy Gunn (Fiddle) and Cathal McConnell (Flute)
    6. The Maid Behind the Bar — Lilted by Michael McCann
    7. Old Arboe — Sung by George Hanna
    8. Reel: The Mason's Apron Barney McKenna (Banjo) & Sean Maguire (Fiddle)
    9. True Lovers' Discourse — Sung by Jerry Hicks
    10. Pair of Reels: O'Rourke's Reel/The Wild Irishman — Sean Maguire (Fiddle) & Barney McKenna (Banjo)
  • Side Two
    1. Jig: Paddy's Return — Lilted by Michael McCann
    2. Slow Air: Tá Sí Na Codhladh — Cathal McConnell (Flute)
    3. Reel: The Maid Behind the Bar — Sean McAloon (Uileann Pipes)
    4. Dobbin's Flowery Vale — Sung by Jerry Hicks
    5. Pair of Jigs: The Lark in the Morning/The Wandering Minstrel — Sean McAloon (Uileann Pipes), Tommy Gunn (Fiddle) and Cathal McConnell (Flute)
    6. The Lisburn Lass — Sung by George Hanna
    7. Hornpipe: The Black Swan — Sean Maguire (Fiddle)
    8. The Blackbird of Mullaghmore — Sung by David Hammond
    9. March: The Pikeman — Cathal McConnell (Flute) and Tommy Gunn (Fiddle)
    10. Sailor Cut Down in his Prime — Sung by Sarah Makem
    11. Pair of Reels: Hunters' Purse/The Copperplate — Sean McAloon (Uileann Pipes), Tommy Gunn (Fiddle) and Cathal McConnell (Flute)

  • Musicians
    • Sarah Makem from Keady, Co. Armagh — Grandmother, singer of a thousand songs.
    • Tommy Gunn from Derrylin, Co. Fermanagh — Fiddler, Hirer, dancer.
    • David Hammond from Belfast — Performer and producer.
    • George Hanna from Derrytresk, Co. Tyrone — Coalminer, head of a singing family.
    • Jerry Hicks from Armagh — Teacher, singer, poet.
    • Sean Maguire from Belfast — Musician extraordinary, virtuoso on the fiddle.
    • Sean McAloon from Rosslea, Co. Fermanagh — "Ireland's natural piper".
    • Michael McCann from Dromore, Co. Tyrone — A delightful lilter.
    • Cathal McConnell from Ballinaleck, Co. Fermanagh — Flute player, quietly and totally committed to music.
    • Barney McKenna from Dublin — "Banjo Barney", lifelong student, superb instrumentalist
    • Music Liaison: Brian ODonnell
  • Credits
    • Produced by David Hammond
    • Music recorded by Michael O'Donnell
    • First broadcast N.I.H.S. July and August 1968

Top Index

Common Ground: Voices of Modern Irish Music
image 
  • Common Ground: Voices of Modern Irish Music
    • 1996 - EMI E2 37691 CD

image  Show Details

image  Hide Details

  • Track List:
    1. O' Bhean A'Ti (Traditional) — Maire Brennan
    2. Mary Of The South Seas (Andy White, Tim & Neil Finn) — Tim and Neil Finn
    3. Tomorrow (U2) — Bono And Adam Clayton
    4. Cavan Potholes (Dónal Lunny) — Sharon Shannon
    5. Help Me To Believe (Paul Brady) — Paul Brady
    6. On Raglan Road (Patrick Kavanagh/Traditional) — Sinead O'Connor
    7. As I Roved Out (Traditional) — Brian Kennedy
    8. The Night Before Larry Was Stretched (Traditional) — Elvis Costello
    9. Mna' Na H-eireann (Ó Riada) — Kate Bush
    10. Whistling Low/Errigal (Davy Spillane/Dónal Lunny) — Davy Spillane and Dónal Lunny
    11. My Heart's Tonight In Ireland (Andy Irvine) — Andy Irvine
    12. Cathain (O Snodaigh) — Liam O Maonlai
    13. Bogie's Bonnie Bell (Traditional) — Christy Moore

  • Musicians
    • Adam Clayton: Bass
    • Adrian Dunbar: Backing Vocals
    • Andy Irvine: Vocals & Bouzouki
    • Andy White: Backing Vocals
    • Barney McKenna: Banjo (The Night Before Larry Was Stretched)
    • Bono: Vocals
    • Brendan Power: Harmonica
    • Brian Kennedy: Vocals
    • Bridín Brennan: Backing Vocals
    • Christy Moore: Vocals & Guitar
    • David Hayes: Keyboards
    • Davy Spillane: Low Whistle & Uilleann Pipes
    • Deirdre Brennan: Backing Vocals
    • Dónal Lunny: Bass Bodhrán, Bodhrán, Bouzouki, Electric Bouzouki, Guitar, Harmonium & Keyboards
    • Elvis Costello: Vocals
    • Eoghan O Neill: Bass
    • The Irish Studio Orchestra: Strings
    • Kate Bush: Vocals
    • Laoise Kelly: Irish Harp
    • Liam Ó Maonlai: Vocals, Bodhrán & Didgeridoo
    • Mairtin O Connor: Button Accordion
    • Neil Finn: Vocals, Piano & Ukulele
    • Noel Eccles: Percussion
    • Nollaig Ní Chathasaigh: Fiddle & Viola
    • Paul Brady: Vocals, Six & Twelve-string Guitar, Keyboards & Whistle
    • Ray Fean: Drums
    • Rens Van Der Zalm: Mandolin
    • Richie Buckley: Tenor & Soprano Saxophone
    • Rita Connolly: Backing Vocals
    • Sharon Shannon: Button Accordion
    • Sinéad O'Connor: Vocals
    • Tim Finn: Vocals
  • Credits
    • Producer: Dónal Lunny
    • Executive-Producer: Gerald Seligman
    • Arrangements: Adam Clayton, Andy Irvine, Andy White, Bono, Brian Kennedy, Christy Moore, David Hayes, Davy Spillane, Dónal Lunny, Elvis Costello, Eoghan O Neill, Fiachra Trench, Kate Bush, Liam Ó Maonlaí, Máire Brennan, Neil Finn, Paul Brady, Ray Fean, Sinéad O'Connor, Tim Finn
    • Strings Arranged & Conducted by Fiachra Trench
    • Recorded by Tim Martin
    • Recording Assistants: Andrew Green, Brian Masterson , Claire Tonkinson, Conan Doyle, Del Palmer , Julie Gardiner , Pete Lewis , Richard Rainey, Rob Kirwan
    • Recorded at Windmill Lane Studios, Bow Lane Studios, Dublin, The Town House, Hanover Quay Studios, & Bunk, Junk & Genius Studios
    • Programmed by Oisín Lunny, Stephen Daley
    • Mixed by Brian Masterson, Dónal Lunny, Adam Clayton, Bono, Tim Martin
    • Mixed at Windmill Lane Studios
    • Edited by Ciarán Byrne
    • Front Cover Photography by Andy Glass
    • Cover Design: Abrahams Pants

Top Index